Fool’s Gold

You may have noticed that housing had a small get together last week.  Yea… this is another Homes for Britain rally blog.  Sorry, it’s been a long week or so and these things don’t write themselves. It was good to see such that such a large cross-section of the housing world was in attendance.  Well they appeared to be based on the tweets.  I didn’t actually speak to too many people… SHOUT were also there in force and it was good to see so many people so passionate about (let’s face it) something that is a bit mundane to the average punter.

The speakers were from all the main political parties (and UKIP) plus a selection of informed contributors. My top 3 were: Ken Loach was full of passion, a fierce wit and an utter lack of respect for time limits.  It was worth the trip alone to see him in full flow. Though sorry fella but a planned economy is never happening.  Frances O’Grady – set fire to the 3rd bar and a few more besides. Full of rage against inequality and injustice, highly articulate and definitely worth listening to.  Finally, Miriam Ahmed. Homeless at a young age, visibly pissed at the hand people can be dealt with and determined to change things for the better. If you are holding a staff conference, or simply want to remind people of why we do what we do, I would suggest getting her along.  Your staff will be singing Les Marseilles quicker than you can say to the barricades.

What was clear however, despite all the glitz and glamour was the enormity of the task ahead. Two very key contributions came from Tim Montgomerie of Conservative Home. The other from Deborah Mattinson of Britain Thinks. Tim noting it is all well and good for all the speakers to say they believe housing is an issue at a pro-housing event but what are they saying elsewhere? Both Labour and the Lib Dems have had opportunities to do so, but haven’t.  This would suggest that neither the public or the political class deem housing to be a vote winner, not just yet at any rate.  This was supported by Deborah who pointed to the fact that polls still place housing down the agenda. That whilst people see housing as an issue they don’t see it an issue affecting them locally, something that is key.  ‘Cos you know if ain’t happening down their road most people don’t give a monkey’s.  Ironically enough a majority think more housing was needed, just not in their backyard thank you very much.

Mr Michael Green Grant Schapps duly popped in to play the pantomime villan (oh no he didn’t…sorry, I’ll stop now).  Whilst all the other parties admitted more work needed to be done on housing (well Farage just went on about brownfield sites, the days of yore and I think something about immigration) Mr Schapps sounded off a bunch of dubious figures with the general demeanour of someone stating, “you’re wrong” at every challenging remark.  He did at least manage a wry smile when reminded of his occasionally dodgy memory by the hostess with the mostess, Jonathan Dimbleby.

It was a hint of things to come from his colleague the Rt Hon Gideon George Osborne (honestly what is it with this lot and names).  In the final budget before the next General Election Mr Osborne popped out another demand side initiative.  A move that is seen as aiming to perpetuate a superficial feel good factor pre-general election. Short term political gain aside it will not do a lot (though it did get the ire of the Institute for Fiscal Studies, small mercies and all that).  Certainly it won’t help to resolve our housing crisis. The two best responses to the budget came from the JRF and Danny Dorling in the Daily Telegraph. I couldn’t put it better myself, so I won’t.

If you want a real downer from the upper that was the homes for britain rally I would suggest reading Mr Halewood’s piece on our inability to frame the terms of reference in the debate on housing.  And our failure to properly highlight our value for money to the taxpayer.  Turns out we save Joe Bloggs a bomb compared to housing poor people in private rent properties.

If you are inclined you can follow me on Twitter here or find me using the Twitter handle @ngoodrich87, you can view the rest of my blogs here.

Let’s face the music and dance

Homes for Britain Rally an important step in PR battle but a pro-housing stance amongst the general public is more nuanced than a simple nod to more social housing.

So the day is about to/has arrived (depending on when you read this) when all and sundry in housing pop down to London town in order to support the call for more housing in Britain.  I must admit I have had my doubts about the campaign.  Whilst the pressure group SHOUT has been very explicit in its calls for more social housing, Homes for Britain has tread a more fleet-footed approach.   No direct mention of social housing, just the line that we have a housing crisis.  I would like to see a more out and out support for social housing than has been the case.  I get the need for an approach that appeals to more than just the housing sector.  But on occasion it feels a little false.  That being said (for the record mostly) I support both Homes for Britain and SHOUT (I’m an inclusive kinda gal).

Despite my ever present doom and gloom recent weeks have been encouraging.  Housing has got into the mainstream press with the NHF in particular getting a large amount of air time.  Ramming the message home that not enough homes are being built.  That all the political parties have a golden opportunity to address a chronic problem.  That inaction is not an option.  And the public appears to be listening.  Shelter even won a highly important victory today over revenge evictions.  No Chope or Davies to filibuster the legislation this time.  Democracy works after all.  Positives aside, the ever reliable guys and gals over at Ipsos Mori have been producing some interesting survey results on housing for a while, not all of them good news.

A remarkable 75% of those surveyed believed there is a housing crisis, but only 5% indicated it would change the way they would vote.  It is also a bit removed, with only 40% saying there was a housing crisis in their local area.  This is a little troublesome.  Unless you can resonate the issue with people positive sentiment will not translate into action. Stuff that appears to sod off other people doesn’t quite cut it.  The Housing Day Survey did indicate a largely positive support for more social housing, but home ownership was still the preferred choice.  And housing is still down the pecking order in more recent pulse checks of the voting pulic perhaps a bit more passion might help our cause?

If you ever needed a bit of a pick me up I suggest you take a look at either this video from Michael Sheen or this one from Harry Smith.  Both provide what our side of the debate often lacks, visible passion, pride.  And a warning not to walk quietly into the night. Raw, un-distilled and in your face.  At a time when more and more it is only sanitized opinions (or needlessly controversial, looking at you Katie Hopkins) that are in the public space, showing some chanelled emotion may prove worthwhile.  As Mr Sheen himself states on the general apathy in British politics “by God believe in something“.  Tomorrow is our opportunity to show we do just that, I hope we grab it.

If you are at the rally I will be in and around and mostly on my best behaviour.  See you there, feel free to pop up and chat.  If you are inclined you can follow me on Twitter here or find me using the Twitter handle @ngoodrich87, you can view the rest of my blogs here.

The Power of Nightmares

If you haven’t managed to I strongly recommend taking a look at a couple of documentaries by Adam Curtis.  The first provides the name for this blog, The Power of Nightmares, the second is Bitter Lake.  Both focus on the power of meta-narratives that seek to explain the world we live in.  Both highlight the often unintended consequences of doing so.  Particularly in Bitter Lake which links the over-simplification of worldviews to the spiralling violence in the Middle East.

Whilst a Neighbourhood Office can be pretty frenetic at times I would balk at comparing it to the various swathes of carnage ripping up parts of the world far away from our shores.  However the central messages from Mr Curtis and his dark, compelling and surreal documentaries ring true for social housing.  For years politicians have used highly negative narratives when looking at the welfare state and social housing.  Providing a justification for dismantling one of the central support systems for the general public.  Where once was assistance is now dependency, where once was a council house now stands a privately owned building sold for a lot more than it was lost for.  Benefit claimants are shirkers, not people.  So the story goes.

Within the pervading political explanations of the modern world is a set of basic assumptions.  And as with Bitter Lake these assumptions, which in turn have driven policy, have led to unintended outcomes.  The emergence of Neo-liberalism from pariah to main stay of both political thought and economic policy brought about a seismic shift in housing tenure. Home ownership has come to dominate the UK Housing market. With this domination a set of ideals, of pre-scripts, have become buried within our nation’s psyche.

Table Numero Uno – Trends in tenure, 1980 to 2013-14

Trends in tenureWe are one of only a few countries in Europe where a property is seen as a money-making endeavour above other beneficial factors of home ownership. Where buy-to-let small-scale landlords have been positively encouraged. Programmes like Homes Under The Hammer or Location, Location, Location typify our approach to housing. We believe house prices will always increase for short-term profit. Yet somehow housing will remain affordable for our children. This is a lie and a dangerous one.

At the same time we have been fed a myth that living standards will always improve. That consumerism is a good thing. That the wheels of the economy will keep on turning and benefit us all. The fact that our current recovery is based on, and now threatened by, ever-increasing individual debt as credit replaces cash savings is ignored. Roll the dice baby, papa needs a new pair of shoes.

The latest Conservative Party policy announcement beautifully illustrates the point. A scheme that provides cheaper home ownership, via public subsidy, at the possible expense of actual affordable (social) housing for the most in need is only possible where the pervading narrative is utterly warped from the reality it seeks to explain. It is about housing, stupid. The utter lack of it. The continued loss of social housing via right to buy. The inability for those of my cohort to even begin to countenance the prospect of buying due to the inherent costs.  Some half-baked initiative to help schmucks like me is akin to pissing in the fucking wind when the mess that is our housing system is seen in its entirety.

As Colin Wiles has noted yet another demand side initiative is not the answer here.  More needs to be done on the supply side.  And with the Private sector so utterly unable to meet pent-up demand approaches like Starter Homes and Help to Buy miss the point.  But given the worldview in which they have been formed, where the state cannot provide the solution, it is perhaps hardly surprising.  What we need is a Government that will reverse the drop in social housing and invest in housing and infrastructure, properly.  Alas I do not see this coming from the boys in blue.

Graph Numero Due – Households aged 25-34, by tenure, 2003-04 to 2013-14

25 to 32 Housing TenureOf small comfort is that housing is now seemingly on the agenda for politicians. However looking more closely at the policy announcements there is still reason enough to be glum. In a week where The Green Party fluffed its lines, where Labour promised 200,000 new homes built a year by 2020.  The Tories for their part have stated they are on course to do this by 2017. The focus is overwhelmingly on home ownership. Social housing is merely an aside. Indeed the Conservative Party has been so consistent in conflating social housing with its wider affordable housing provision aims I think they see schemes like Help to Buy, in their eyes at least, as an acceptable form of social housing (see equation below).

Social Rent = Affordable Rent
Affordable Rent = Affordable Housing
Affordable Housing = Cheap home ownership.
Providing cheap home ownership = Providing social housing(ish)

The policy announcements of this week are a start but they are nowhere near enough. Nice sound bites and vague promises around how much housing will be built. Or in the case of Brandon Lewis an absence of targets (guess you can’t miss them if you don’t have them…). Are all well and good but the lack of a coherent approach to housing policy has left this country in a very large pickle. Just got to hope we will eventually wake up.

If you feel so inclined you can follow me on Twitter here or find me using the Twitter handle @ngoodrich87, you can view the rest of my blogs here.