Do Millennials Dream of Electric Sheep?

Organisations need to be smarter in how they approach general training, personal development and high level talent management if they are to get the best out of their staff.

Please, Please, Please Let Me Get What I Want

When asked to prioritise what they want millennials tend to want jobs where they can make a difference, have personal development, as well as to be able to work flexibly and attain job fulfilment. Sometimes these are substituted for just being able to have a job. The first three points are consistently given as more important than simply getting a bigger paycheck.  Though on a personal level if you wanna chuck more cash at me, I ain’t gunna bitch about it. Joking aside, this is a change in priorities when compared to previous generations. It is something businesses are yet to fully get to grips with. That is partly down to how they approach personal development, something that needs to be worked on.

Don’t get me wrong, you shouldn’t believe all the hype. Millennials won’t solve all your organisation’s problems. But neither are they the complete shower that some would like to have you believe. My kith and kin have simply grown up at a time where one’s life goals and career paths have become increasingly fluid. An occurrence born out of necessity as much as design. Because after one of the biggest financial disasters occurs you take whatever work you can get.  This has had knock-on consequences in our outlook on jobs and life more generally.

Tailoring to fit

People may largely want the same thing (to get paid, to develop, to progress) but how that is achieved can vary significantly. For all of the talk of flexible working, and the desire for a job that fulfils malark, even we pesky kids still want steady jobs, regular benefits and paychecks from our employers. Presumably because sweet thoughts, dreams and unicorns don’t pay the exorbitant rent we have to cough up. But more broadly life approaches are different. That nuance is important when designing, delivering &  embedding in training and development programmes.

But all the above is moot if the culture behind the organisation stymies what your employees are learning. Because there is no point sending your staff on expensive training programmes if the culture, politics and environment back in the workplace nullifies any potential benefits/changes in approach at its source. For a case and point check out this article on leadership training and how it fails. It is, illuminating, but also beautifully highlights the point. In short, only when you get your house in order, will your flock, and business, grow.

This Is The End, My Only Friend, The  End

Fundamentally, understanding how your employees tick will enable you to go a long way in getting the best out of them. I’ve used millennials as an example in this blog because I am one, and they’re increasingly making up a significant chunk of our workforce. But the point applies across all your employees. Because, as this excellent blog from Tom Murtha points out, you don’t stop your development upon reaching the loftier levels of an organisation.

Obviously, the type and level of support of 40 year old director needs is very different to an apprentice new on the job. But they are part of the same whole. And in the end it’s just about people, their aspirations, and how that can be tapped into moving the organisation forward.

Photo Credit – Dickson Phua (2017) – The Spiral Into Desolation

As ever, you can find more of my stuff here and follow me on Twitter here.

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Float On

As a child my ladyfriend was asked what she wanted to be when she grew up. She replied matter of factly that she was going to be a lipstick. A response that wins hands down in terms of blue sky thinking. Alas my aspirations were a bit more mundane. If I remember correctly the two main ones were to become a Firefighter or a mechanic. Turns out I’m afraid of heights and crap with tools, so it’s probably a good thing I got into housing.

Who’d have thought that after all, Something as simple as rock ‘n’ roll would save us all

I’ve never particularly had a plan. Other than I knew I wanted to work in social housing, and even that came quite late, it’s all been a bit fuzzy. As a teenager and in my early 20s I did my fair share of crap jobs. Ones that suck the life out of you. Subsequently my only real guide has been to find jobs that are of interest to me, that challenge me, and hopefully ones that can leave behind some kind of meaningful change. Other than that I’m pretty open to the options out there.

Perhaps that lack of a plan probably wasn’t a bad thing, Chairman Mao-esk 5 yr plans have historically left a lot of people dead, but more importantly priorities change and as Colin Powell noted ‘No plan survives the battlefield’, so why have one? More’s the point, despite what those earnest posts on LinkedIn will have you believe, very few people have set out plans for their career development, let alone a point by point explanation of their daily routine. Weirdos.

If you don’t have a dream, How you gonna have a dream come true?

However, not having a plan is not the same as not having an end goal. So if you had asked me 5 years ago where I wanted to end up I’d have probably said as a Chief Executive of a Housing Association. The pay is pretty good (or bad, depending on your point of view) and in being white, middle class and male I figured I was near enough half way there. However, if you asked me now, I’m not sure if I’d still agree with my younger self.

I’ve witnessed one parent suffer a nervous breakdown and battle depression, and saw the other drop dead as their semi-retirement approached. Such events tend to give one pause for thought. Particularly when it comes to how one’s work/life balance is set up. As you get further up the greasy pole that balancing act becomes harder to manage. These days I’m unsure if I’m willing to pay the price to maintain it.

I’ve got mates with kids who hate their jobs, but feel the need to stay in the role because they need the money. For them coming home to their family makes it worthwhile. Whilst I can see that point of view, I don’t think I could stand being in a job that I hated. But who am I to judge? 

I guess that’s the point though, isn’t it? We all make different life choices for different reasons*. A point we’re sometimes too quick to forget, and should try harder to remember. One person’s success is another’s mediocrity. In the end it’s all relative, we’re all just floating along trying to work out what it all means. If you ever find the answer (I hear it’s 42) do let me know.

*For a case and point see this handy guide on how not to be a complete dick when someone tells you they don’t have/aren’t planning on having any kids. 

As ever, you can find more of my stuff here and follow me on Twitter here.

Photo Credit – Ian Hasley (2012) Tower Block_Jardine Crescent_Coventry_Feb12